Mom shares message after teen daughter dies of rare COVID-related condition

‘I hope my daughter’s story can save a life’: Charlotte mom shares story after teen dies of...
‘I hope my daughter’s story can save a life’: Charlotte mom shares story after teen dies of rare COVID-related condition(Family photo)
Published: Jul. 12, 2021 at 1:55 PM EDT
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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV/Gray News) - A mother is sharing her story after her daughter died from a rare condition linked to COVID-19 in children.

WBTV reports Alyssa Simons of Charlotte died at age 15 after she tested positive for the virus in March.

Simons’ mother Shernett Reevey said Alyssa started complaining about stomach and back pains weeks after contracting the virus. Reevey made a doctor’s appointment, but her daughter’s condition rapidly deteriorated.

“She didn’t make it to the appointment because I had to call 911,” Reevey said. “The four, five days I was gone, she lost like 40 pounds.”

Doctors diagnosed Simons with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) — a condition where different body parts, including some vital organs, become inflamed.

‘I hope my daughter’s story can save a life’: Charlotte mom shares story after teen dies of...
‘I hope my daughter’s story can save a life’: Charlotte mom shares story after teen dies of rare COVID-related condition(Family photo)

Simons returned home after a 10-day hospital stay, but her recovery was short-lived.

“I started noticing she didn’t want to come down the stairs,” Reevey said. “She started complaining, she was feeling weak.”

Reevey booked an appointment with a specialist, but Simons wouldn’t make it. She died on June 28.

“She gave me a hug, and I went to go lay down, and I came in the morning and she was already passed away,” Reevey said.

‘I hope my daughter’s story can save a life’: Charlotte mom shares story after teen dies of...
‘I hope my daughter’s story can save a life’: Charlotte mom shares story after teen dies of rare COVID-related condition(Family photo)

Reevey is sharing her daughter’s story with the hope others will learn the warning signs about their children if they have MIS-C.

“Look at your kids and the symptoms they have. COVID is real, and there is other stuff that comes after COVID,” Reevey said. “I hope my daughter’s story can save a life. If you’re questioning getting vaccinated, maybe you reconsider, especially with the kids going back to school.”

Everyone in Reevey’s family that’s eligible is now vaccinated, but Simons was unable to get the vaccine in March because of stricter age restrictions at the time.

The CDC recommends parents to call a doctor if a child shows symptoms of MIS-C. Symptoms include abdominal pain, bloodshot eyes, rash and vomiting. If a child has trouble breathing, persistent chest pains and pressure or pale skin, parents should seek emergency medical care.

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